Working Off Worry

Want to get rid of gloomy thoughts? Try working some physical activity into your daily routine, says a new study.

Even adorable kitties need an endorphin boost sometimes.

For people who struggle with depression and anxiety, the research shows, exercise can be just as effective as antidepressant medication. It often prevents symptoms from getting worse – and in some cases, it even helps cure the problem.

Doctors have known for decades that a little physical activity can help distract you from your worries, boost positive feelings, and even relieve anxiety and depression. But in recent years, research has shown that exercise’s hidden effects reach much deeper: it tells your body to produce endorphins – natural chemicals that act similarly to morphine - to produce a natural high. And studies have shown that regular exercise can even make you smarter, by increasing blood flow to the brain and triggering neurogenesis – the birth of new neurons.

But as this new paper in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry reports, a team led by UT Southwestern’s Dr. Madhukar Trivedi has discovered something even more exciting – a regular dose of exercise can work just as well as antidepressant medication:

Many people who start on an antidepressant medication feel better after they begin treatment, but they still don’t feel completely well or as good as they did before they became depressed. This study shows that exercise can be as effective as adding another medication.

In other words, patients who exercised instead of adding a second drug often improved just as much as people who did add another drug.

By the time the 12-week study was finished, almost 30 percent of the patients who exercised had achieved full remission of their depression, and another 20 percent showed significant improvement. That’s close to 50 percent of depressed patients whose moods measurably improved thanks to exercise.

It’s also intriguing that different types of exercise seem to have different effects on people with various characteristics:

Moderate exercise was more effective for women with a family history of mental illness, whereas intense exercise was more effective with women whose families did not have a history of the disease. For men, the higher rate of exercise was more effective regardless of other characteristics.

So if you’re a woman with crazy parents, you might benefit most from a quick jog on the treadmill – but it looks like I’m gonna have to run a Warrior Dash if I want to stop sulking.

Anyway, the good news is, it doesn’t take much of an investment to start seeing the benefits of exercise – most doctors recommend somewhere between 30 and 60 minutes, three times a week. Even taking a short walk on your lunch break can cheer you up.

Unless you’re perambulating on one of these things – I don’t think that counts.

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2 Responses to “Working Off Worry”

  1. This is very interesting because traditional psychology has said that exercise was a healthy coping mechanism. To see it directly compared with pharmaceuticals is very powerful.

  2. [...] Get out and about Lots of studies show that physical activity raises levels of endorphins – the body’s own [...]

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